Clean Eating Mongolian Beef

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I love Chinese food but I just KNOW that they use sugar and other ingredients I try to avoid.  This is my clean eating version of Mongolian Beef

Ingredients

8 oz beef tenderloin (thinly sliced)
2 tablespoons olive oil
2  scallions (sliced diagonally)
1 inch ginger (finely chopped)
3 cloves garlic (thinly sliced)

Marinade:

1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon Braggs amino acid
1 tablespoon water
1 teaspoon Chinese cooking wine (rice wine or Shaoxing wine)

Sauce:

2 teaspoons oyster sauce
2 3/4  tablespoons Braggs amino acid
3 dashes white pepper powder
1/4 teaspoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon agave nectar, to taste
Salt to taste

Instructions

Marinate the beef slices with the seasonings for 30 minutes. Heat up a wok with 1 tablespoon of oil and stir-fry the marinated beef until they are half-done. Remove the beef and set aside.

Heat up another 1 tablespoon of oil and saute the garlic and ginger until aromatic. Add the beef back into the wok and then the sauce. Continue to stir-fry until the beef slices are almost done, then add the leeks/scallions into the wok. Do a few quick stirs, add salt to taste, dish out and serve hot.

Enjoy!!

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Comments

  1. will make this tonight.
    Any suggestions for fructose-free substitute for oyster sauce? I don’t have clam juice or oysters & would be worried about storage of a sauce made with these, but I’m happy to use fish sauce.
    I have made a substitute with ginger, soy sauce, fish sauce, dextrose & guar gum. Adequate, but not particularly wonderful.

  2. Do you have a print button somewhere? (my computer is a desktop, so not in the kitchen)

  3. This was delicious & the family loved it!
    My daughter even boasted to a friend online that we were going to have home-made Mongolian Beef, lol! They want me to make it again.

    [I didn’t use agave coz not fructose free, but used rice malt syrup. Just added a bit more ginger & didn’t worry about oyster sauce. Just fine.
    FYI – I didn’t have any Chinese wine & checked online for substitutes. Glad I checked coz might have used rice wine vinegar, but apparently not a good sub. One site suggested gin as a substitute. We don’t drink gin but have a really old 1/3 bottle that was my mother-in-law’s, so now I’ve found a use for it!]